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A Virtual IP address (commonly referred to as a VIP) refers to an IP address that is configured to accept network traffic arriving to it and redirect that traffic to different IP addresses within a "pool" of IP addresses that have been configured to accept the traffic based on certain rules. VIPs are often used for connection redundancy; a VIP address may still be available if a server fails because an alternative server replies to connection requests. A load-balanced VIP is a VIP where traffic is distributed among a group of servers.  A VIP is sometimes referred to as a reverse proxy (a reverse proxy dispatches in-bound inbound network traffic to a set of servers, presenting a single interface to the caller). In addition to redundancy, VIP functionality can be used for port translation - they can answer incoming traffic on a given port, but translate the traffic to a separate port as it is sent to the destination IP address 

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  • Public IPv4 address on a Network Domain - In this case, the Virtual Listener listens to a an IPv4 address exposed on the Public Internet. This option is useful for managing traffic coming from the public Internet. However, unlike MCP 1.0, Public VIP addresses are also accessible from servers within the Network Domain
  • "Private" IPv4 address - In this case, the Virtual Listener listens to a an IPv4 address that is not associated with the ranges of any VLAN on the Network Domain. Since these IP addresses are only routable inside the Network Domain, they can't be used for traffic coming from the public Internet but instead, are useful for managing traffic between VLANs and/or traffic coming from a CPNC (Cloud Private Network Connection). 

For MCP 2.0, a VIP is configured in the context of a particular Network Domain and is restricted to Advanced Network Domains. A VIP is comprised of a number of component resources, as shown in the diagram below:

The top-level component which brings VIP functionality together in MCP 2.0 is the Virtual Listener. The Virtual Listener declares the public or private IPv4 address (the listener address) through which the VIP routes traffic and optionally a port to limit the scope of the traffic. Traffic is not processed by a VIP unless the Virtual Listener is enabled.

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Up to two Health Monitors may be set to observe and react to the health of the Pool Members. Note that Health Monitors can only be used if the Pool Members are set to use specific port numbers; it is not compatible to have Health Monitors on a Pool that has any Pool Members set to the "Any Port" option. 

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For detailed information about Nodes, their properties, creation, and management see: 

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Traditionally, accepting SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) connections using the HTTPS protocol requires installing the necessary SSL certificates and keys on a web server. This allows the web server the webserver to handle the HTTPS requests (and more specifically, the SSL negotiation to start the connection) by decrypting incoming traffic and re-encrypting it its outbound traffic. However, this approach is costly in processing power on the server.  When you are load balancing across multiple servers, it also involves installing and managing the certificate and keys across multiple servers.

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Port translation allows you to accept traffic on the Virtual Listener on one port than , then redirect to the pool of nodes on a different port. Such translation is often done for security purposes but has other purposes depending on the scenario.

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